From etymonline.com:

chronicle (n.) c.1300, cronicle, from Anglo-French cronicle, from Old French cronique "chronicle" (Modern French chronique), from Latin chronica (neuter plural mistaken for fem. singular), from Greek ta khronika (biblia) "the (books of) annals, chronology," neuter plural of khronikos "of time." Ending modified in Anglo-French, perhaps by influence of article. Old English had cranic "chronicle," cranicwritere "chronicler." The classical -h- was restored in English from 16c.

IAM.

(being)(with)(you)(me)

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~#TIAC

Read the Printed Word!

19th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Moose Moore, Pug Extraordinaire with 82 notes

moosepug:

help im stuck in an endless maze of hay and hunger

moosepug:

help im stuck in an endless maze of hay and hunger

19th October 2014

Photo reblogged from with 361 notes

tulipnight:

On The Edge by Andrew Paul Watson on Flickr.

tulipnight:

On The Edge by Andrew Paul Watson on Flickr.

19th October 2014

Photo reblogged from 8minutesplease with 2,241 notes

Source: losinghead

17th October 2014

Quote reblogged from The Mountain Gentleman with 12 notes

I am looking for someone to share in an adventure.
Tolkien (via terracompassum)

15th October 2014

Photo reblogged from with 938 notes

tiny-librarian:

“Kazul’s not my dragon.” Cimorene said sharply. “I’m her princess. You’ll never have any luck dealing with dragons if you don’t get these things straight.” 
Dealing With Dragons - Patricia C. Wrede

tiny-librarian:

“Kazul’s not my dragon.” Cimorene said sharply. “I’m her princess. You’ll never have any luck dealing with dragons if you don’t get these things straight.”

Dealing With Dragons - Patricia C. Wrede

Source: tiny-librarian

11th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Now is forever with 3,560 notes

magicsystem:

untitled by appelsin-piken on Flickr.

magicsystem:

untitled by appelsin-piken on Flickr.

Source: magicsystem

7th October 2014

Quote reblogged from YOGA ♥ FOR SUPERHEROES with 147 notes

The world you see is just a movie in your mind.
Rocks dont see it.
Bless and sit down.
Forgive and forget.
Practice kindness all day to everybody
and you will realize you’re already
in heaven now.
That’s the story.
That’s the message.
Nobody understands it,
nobody listens, they’re
all running around like chickens with heads cut
off. I will try to teach it but it will
be in vain, s’why I’ll
end up in a shack
praying and being
cool and singing
by my woodstove
making pancakes.
— Jack Kerouac (via carldavisblog)

Source: carldavisblog

6th October 2014

Quote with 2 notes

Life changes in the instant. The ordinary instant.
— ― Joan Didion, The Year of Magical Thinking

6th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from Pen Pal Pictures with 1,876 notes

nevver:

Lost Horizon, Louise Lebourgeois

Source: louiselebourgeois.com

6th October 2014

Photo reblogged from America's Great Outdoors with 457 notes

americasgreatoutdoors:

Gliding through mountains, canyons, meadows, and the vast farmlands of the Snake River plains, lined with commanding cottonwood galleries and a lush shrub understory, the Snake River Corridor is truly a beautiful and unique destination. The area offers diverse recreational opportunities with over 300,000 visits per year and sustains a broad variety of plant, fish, bird and wildlife populations. It is also home to the federally threatened Ute ladies’ tresses orchid and is a world-famous blue ribbon fishery, supporting the largest wild Yellowstone cutthroat trout population outside of Yellowstone National Park. The first World Fly Fishing Championship in North America was even hosted here in 1997. Thanks in part to the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) this area will continue to be preserved and enjoyed.  Photo copyright: Leland Howard

americasgreatoutdoors:

Gliding through mountains, canyons, meadows, and the vast farmlands of the Snake River plains, lined with commanding cottonwood galleries and a lush shrub understory, the Snake River Corridor is truly a beautiful and unique destination. The area offers diverse recreational opportunities with over 300,000 visits per year and sustains a broad variety of plant, fish, bird and wildlife populations. It is also home to the federally threatened Ute ladies’ tresses orchid and is a world-famous blue ribbon fishery, supporting the largest wild Yellowstone cutthroat trout population outside of Yellowstone National Park. The first World Fly Fishing Championship in North America was even hosted here in 1997. Thanks in part to the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) this area will continue to be preserved and enjoyed.  

Photo copyright: Leland Howard